Alan Cumming on Pride Awards, LGBT rights

Alan Cumming wrapped “The Good Wife” in 2016, but the actor and romantic is staying bustling with TV and film projects, concerts and human rights activism work. 

The Scottish-born actor is famous for his untiring work with organizations like GLAAD, the Hetrick-Martin Institute, Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS, the Ali Forney Center, the Family Equality Council and more. 

Cumming will horde the first-ever Village Voice Pride Awards in New York on Jun 21, which will commend internal and global heroes in the LGBTQ movement. He talked to CBS News about the event, his concerns for the LGBT village during President Donald Trump’s term and his new TV show, “Instinct.” 

This is the first year of the Pride Awards. What can we expect?

It’s a jubilee of the whole operation of people — people and organizations who have contributed to LGBT rights. Vanguards and mentors who spearheaded positivity for LGBT people in society. The operation of forms of awards is amazing. we know Tegan and Sara are playing.  

How did you get connected with the event?

They asked me. I’m an adopted New Yorker and we live downtown, so it creates sense. It’s such a new thing and it’s extraordinary that in the time we find ourselves in right now, this whole new kind of awards rite to applaud LGBT people and those who have championed that — the fact that it’s happening in Trump’s America right now is really positive. It’s a good instance of resistance.

Do you have any traditions for Pride Week?

This year for Pride Weekend, I’m in San Francisco with a film festival and I’m off doing Concert for America, so I’m not in New York. we don’t really have any kind of traditions, but customarily my friends have a grill called Highlands in the West Village and they always have a really good dance party after the parade. I’ve been to that a few times. we consider Pride is a really good thing. we consider we should continue that feeling every singular day.

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You pronounced progressing that it’s conspicuous that this eventuality is getting its start while Mr. Trump is president. Can you speak some-more about your concerns about the meridian for LGBT people right now in America and around the world?

In terms of the impact around the world, people demeanour to America — reduction and reduction now, of course, given Trump became president. He’s an annoyance to America for people looking at us, but we consider positively his miss of seductiveness in stability the routine of ancillary equivalence in all areas is something that people will demeanour at. That apparently has an outcome in America and around the world. Hate crimes against LGBT people — generally transgender people, generally against people of tone — have rocketed, and of march they would since you have someone who condones those attacks by silence.

I just feel that when you have someone as undiscerning and pandering to anyone who will keep him in his place of power, that’s a very dangerous place if you’re in a minority organisation that recently just had a big swell in equality. If you consider the reasons since we have Trump is a large recoil against people of tone in the White House, it’s also a recoil against laws during [President Barack] Obama’s time and a lot of laws regarding to the LGBT community.

I feel apparently New York or anywhere nearby water in America where you have people coming from other cultures, you’re not frightened or horrible of them, but there are big swathes of America that are still very aroused of the other, and we worry about immature kids who are in an sourroundings that says if the boss is a bully, then since shouldn’t you be?  

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Your film “After Louie” is about a happy man who was an AIDS romantic in the ’80s and ’90s and struggles to know the younger era of happy men. Do you describe to that at all?

Well, we describe to it since in the film there’s a breach of generations. People who have lived by the AIDS widespread and dealt with people failing all around them, those people and immature people currently aren’t really communicating. That’s a unconditional generalization, but there’s a problem. Instead of communication between generations — partly since there’s a blank era of people who would routinely pass down stories and be mentors and they have died — there is a kind of schism.

I consider it’s a really fascinating thing and that deals with the breach from both sides very eloquently and sincerely since some people have large PTSD from vital by the AIDS widespread and pull divided immature people who weren’t there, and immature people don’t caring about story and what has happened in sequence for them to be where they are today. It creates you comprehend we both have to reassess how we’re feeling about it and enchanting people of opposite generations and accept that there’s a massive, large PTSD of this disease that happened 20 years ago. That’s what we associated to. we don’t feel like my impression in that we wasn’t in New York then and we didn’t have people failing all around me, but we do know the thing of “If you weren’t in the war, you’re never going to know the war” or “Don’t pull me divided since we wasn’t in the war, just speak to me.” That’s what we adore about the film.

Any other projects you’re operative on?

I’m on a new radio series on CBS — I’m back on CBS again! I’m in a show called “Instinct.”  

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