New Whitney Houston documentary portrays her ‘painful’ life

Showtime’s new Whitney Houston documentary is not always fun to watch — and that’s coming from its executive producer.

“An accurate description of her life,” says Vinnie Malhotra, “is unfortunately a unpleasant one.”

Premiering Friday at 9 p.m., “Whitney: Can we Be Me” has a dark that’s mitigated but never vanquished by Houston’s music.

Houston’s albums — with songs like “The Greatest Love Of All,” “I Wanna Dance With Somebody (Who Loves Me),” “So Emotional” and “How Will we Know” — sole multimillions. The manuscript from the 1992 film “The Bodyguard,” which includes her delivery of Dolly Parton’s “I Will Always Love You,” stays the best-selling soundtrack ever.

She became a cocktail music icon, earning an estimated quarter-billion dollars in her lifetime, and “Can we Be Me,” destined by Nick Broomfield, acknowledges all that.

From left to right, Whitney Houston, Bobby Brown, Cissy Houston and Robyn Crawford at a pre-Grammy Party in 1994.

From left to right, Whitney Houston, Bobby Brown, Cissy Houston and Robyn Crawford at a pre-Grammy Party in 1994.

(RTNBaker/MediaPunch/IPx/AP)

Whitney Houston (far right) with her parents, dad John and mom Cissy. 

Whitney Houston (far right) with her parents, dad John and mom Cissy. 

It also suggests “all that” helped create the problems — drugs, alcohol, divorce, nauseous headlines and perfect vigour — that paved the trail to Feb. 11, 2012, when Houston was found passed in a Beverly Hills hotel bathtub at the age of 48.

“Nick shows how Whitney was the victim of a complement that many have depressed chase to,” says Malhotra, and that complement particularly includes apropos the fame-and-fortune sheet for everybody around you, including family.

In one of the film’s many overwhelming moments, Houston’s former real-life bodyguard David Roberts talks about how, after a debate riddled with drug use, he wrote a report observant the only thing that mattered was addressing that problem now.

The response from her government was to appreciate the bodyguard for his services, which would no longer be required.

Whitney Houston behaving at a Grammy eventuality at The Beverly Hilton hotel in 2009. 

Whitney Houston behaving at a Grammy eventuality at The Beverly Hilton hotel in 2009. 

(Rick Diamond/WireImage)

“Her handlers didn’t even consider it a doubt of, ‘Hey, let’s take a break,’” Malhotra says. “It was some-more like, ‘Keep going,’ since there were a lot of people feeding off her.”

Broomfield didn’t speak with the Houston family, which is now operative with Scottish executive Kevin Macdonald on an certified documentary.

Malhotra suggests Broomfield may have gotten a some-more honest portrayal, despite a darker one, by articulate with people like Houston’s rope or beautician who don’t have any personal seductiveness over wanting people to know what they saw.

“Nick found they were fervent to talk,” says Malhotra. “They’ve listened what’s out there and they don’t see those stories as an accurate portrayal.”

Exported.;

Whitney Houston and Bobby Brown arrive at a pre-Grammy party in happier times. 

(JILL CONNELLY/AP)

DNP;

Whitney Houston binds her daughter Bobbi Kristina at the 1994 American Music Awards.

(MARK J TERRILL/AP)

Like the film, Malhotra suggests a vicious partial of the vigour on Houston came from her mom Cissy, a cocktail and gospel thespian who taught and neat Whitney from childhood.

“I see an undercurrent of jealousy with Cissy over Whitney’s success,” he says. “Certain moments exhibit that.”

Not that it was just Cissy.

“If Whitney had opposite people around her” in general, Malhotra suggests, “her life competence not have left in the instruction it did.”

WHITNEY. â�?�?CAN we BE MEâ�?**Showtime network Handout **VCOVER20F

Whitney Houston with close crony Robyn Crawford, as seen in this picture featured in Showtime’s new documentary, “Can we Be Me.” 

(Lafayette Films/Passion Pictures/Lafayette Films/Passion Pictures)

“Can we Be Me” points to several specific flashpoints that people around Houston saw as bad for her: descending in with her contingent husband Bobby Brown; having to residence report about her passionate welfare since of her close loyalty with Robyn Crawford; being booed as a “sellout” at the 1989 Soul Train Awards; being sued by the party company that was co-run by the failing father she adored; finding after “The Bodyguard” that she couldn’t go out in public; and finally having Crawford forced out of her life since of passion from Cissy and Brown — who also couldn’t mount any other.

Houston done some bad choices, the film suggests, but too many of her choices were done for her — including the seminal gauge that she sing only cocktail songs despite her adore of gospel and RB.

“It worked for her until it didn’t,” Malhotra says. “You see the fun gradually being sucked out of her life. We watch a pleasing star bake out — and yes, it’s painful.”

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