These tumble food festivals will have you drooling

In New York, food festivals come in all flavors. Whether it’s a prohibited time at Brooklyn’s Chile Pepper festival, home cooking by “chefugees,” or cooking with the stars, it’s all on the menu this season.

San Gennaro

(Through Sept. 24 on Mulberry St. between Canal and Houston Sts.; and tools of Grand and Hester Sts.; sangennaro.org; free to walk around, food for purchase)

This street satisfactory that celebrates the Patron Saint of Naples has turn a Big Apple institution, and a must for tourists and locals. Admit it — even if you’ll never indulge in boiled mix or sugar-dusted cannoli, it’s still a disturb to come down to Little Italy to people-watch, check out carny games, and breathe sweet-savory scents from affogato to ziti. On Sept. 23, Tony Danza will horde a don’t-miss meatball-eating contest, and an onstage spectacular will salute evermore cold Rat Packer Dean Martin on what would have been his centennial birthday year.

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Refugee Food Art Festival

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“Chefugees” will ready their internal specialties, like this Bedouin chicken, at the first Refugee Food Art Festival.

(Komeeda)

(Sept. 22-24 at 210 East 43rd St.; komeeda.com; tickets $20 – $80 for opposite events)

You may have listened of Displaced Dinners, the series that connects recently resettled refugees — who prepare internal specialties — with brave internal diners. The dishes have been such a pound they’ve now desirous this 3 day-festival, reasonably situated stairs from the UN during its General Assembly. You’ll meet new arrivals from the Middle East, South America, and Eastern Europe at the festival. You can also enjoy your food meaningful every “chefugee” is getting paid. Choose from brunches, lunches or dinners, and open your mind as good as your mouth as these cooks share their stories.

Chile Pepper Festival

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(Oct. 1, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, 150 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn; bbg.org; $25 for adults, $20 for seniors and students, kids under 12)

It’s the hottest eventuality of the deteriorate — literally. The Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s annual Chile Pepper Festival marks its 25th book this year, with sizzling universe music, burning food tastings, and chili products from scarcely 50 vendors, many Brooklyn-based. If you’ve been forgetful of chili-based jams, pickles, and ice creams, here’s your chance. Keep an eye out too for chili-infused chocolate, artisanal prohibited sauces, and “Hi-Scoville Treats,” candies named for the barbarous spiciness scale. There will even be a “capsicum connoisseur” on palm to learn you about cultivating peppers. And internal chefs will share sharp culinary wisdom.

Expect an additional assisting of celebs at the New York City Wine  Food Festival; Neil Patrick Harris (r.) and husband David Burtka (second from right) drew fans last year.

Expect an additional assisting of celebs at the New York City Wine Food Festival; Neil Patrick Harris (r.) and husband David Burtka (second from right) drew fans last year.

(Neilson Barnard/NYCWFF)

New York City Wine Food Festival

(Oct. 12-15 at Piers 92 and 94 in Manhattan, and other venues; nycwff.org; tickets: from $50-$360)

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One of New York’s biggest food festivals is also the poshest, with pricey dinners hosted by culinary celebs like Alain Ducasse, Mario Batali and Gabrielle Hamilton. Most of the top-tier events have already sole out, so your best bet’s the walk-around tastings around town, like the “Pigs and Pints” pork-focused samplings on Oct. 14 ($110), or the Oct. 15 “Fromage Fete” ($95) with cheese maven Liz Thorpe at Chelsea’s Norwood club. If you’re set on star-gazing while you munch, you’ll find additional helpings of celebrities at this fest’s events, from Kristin Chenoweth to Debi Mazar and Whoopi Goldberg, who’s hosting an Oct. 12 cooking at soul-food house Sylvia’s ($225).

At Brooklyn's One More Bite festival, little gourmands will get to season new flavors, and learn how their food gets grown and made.

At Brooklyn’s One More Bite festival, little gourmands will get to season new flavors, and learn how their food gets grown and made.

(Quyn Duong)

One More Bite

(Oct. 22, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. at The Green Building, 452 Union St., Brooklyn; onemorebite.co; tickets: $5/adults, free for kids)

It’s a little food festival — but a big deal. One More Bite’s the newest Brooklyn food fest designed with kids in mind. Your little gourmands will get to season new flavors, and learn how their food gets grown and made. Every child gets a passbook to fill with activity stamps; they can redeem it for free goodies from hip vendors like Ovenly, Pirasta, Goodie Girl Cookies and barkTHINS. Organizers at this Gowanus eventuality advise you “dress for washable mess,” generally if you’re up for the “food coloring” workshop, making masterpieces with apples and pumpkins. Adults will find copiousness of grownup activities, from parenting panels to cooking mini-classes.

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