Deloitte’s Cathy Engelbert on being a womanlike CEO

DAVOS, Switzerland — Deloitte’s Cathy Engelbert is one of the first women to turn a CEO of a Big Four accounting firm. She recently spoke with Edie Lush — co-host of Global GoalsCast — at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, about what it’s like to be a lady in such a absolute role. 

“At the time, the Wall Street Journal pronounced you were, ‘Cracking the potion ceiling,'” Lush said. “How does that feel?”

“I’ve gotten used to it now. But we speak about how we need to pierce these elevations of women into pivotal roles from newness to norm. we consider it’s really critical to concentration on that,” Engelbert said. “It was a big understanding to me privately to get this role. What we didn’t comprehend was what a big understanding it was outward the organisation to get this role. It’s been good to show that women can be leaders of big companies.” 

Engelbert juggles a bustling report between her personal life and work life, but she creates it work. Outside of the office, she’s a mom to two adult children. 

“It is really critical to be a role model, and to share stories about how it works and how infrequently it doesn’t work,” she said. “And then learn from when it doesn’t work, how you can adjust.”

In Sep 2016, Engelbert changed Deloitte’s leave policy, a pierce that was well-received within the company and helped them keep staff, as good as contest in the marketplace for talent. 

“Our family leave program we consider is industry-leading. Sixteen weeks for men and women, not just for parental leave, but for any family matters. It’s been amazingly positive,” Engelbert said. “Our people are fired up. The best email we got was from a man who pronounced ‘I wish we never have to use it for a sick primogenitor or a sick child but if gives me assent of mind that it’s there’. We did something that was right for the people.”

“You’ve been looking this year to reposition Deloitte,” Lush interjected. “Deloitte already serves about 85 percent of the Fortune 500, and you’ve been looking at being an creation catalyst. With that, you’ve determined a series of vital partners: Apple, Amazon, Facebook and HP. What do those partnerships bring to Deloitte?”

“I consider it’s clear, no one company can do it alone in this fast-paced industrial revolution. We’re apparently really good at portion the clients, have really good relations with clients,” Engelbert said. “We also partner with rising expansion companies. So there’s a whole ecosystem where we consider about it.”

“The hardest partial about being a CEO today, we think, is there so many shifts going on,” she continued. “Where do you muster your capital? What choices to do you make? What impact do you wish to have? Then, you have to bring in the fact with a 62 percent millennial workforce, the people wish purpose driven in all we do. And you’ve got to take caring of well-being. So, it’s a fascinating time to be a personality and make these choices in how, again, you allot not only your human capital, your financial capital, but your own time as a CEO.” 

Asked what she wished she had famous progressing in her career, Engelbert responded: “Your career is not linear, it changes. You need to lift your palm and have certainty and take risks. When you don’t wish to do something, you have to have what you wish to do right behind it. The personality that thinks of you for positions wants to know you’re assisting solve another problem they competence have.

“I wish we had famous some-more about when to lift my hand, how much certainty we could have in myself and my abilities,” she continued. “I share my story a lot about failures we had since we learn so much some-more from the failures than the successes.” 


Is it probable to change the world? Can we still make the world a better place for us all to live? UNICEF special confidant Claudia Romo Edelman and Hub Culture executive editor Edie Lush — hosts of the Global Goalscast — trust the answer is a resounding ‘yes,’ and that everybody can play a part. Subscribe to the podcast here.

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Deloitte’s Cathy Engelbert on being a womanlike CEO

DAVOS, Switzerland — Deloitte’s Cathy Engelbert is one of the first women to turn a CEO of a Big Four accounting firm. She recently spoke with Edie Lush — co-host of Global GoalsCast — at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, about what it’s like to be a lady in such a absolute role. 

“At the time, the Wall Street Journal pronounced you were, ‘Cracking the potion ceiling,'” Lush said. “How does that feel?”

“I’ve gotten used to it now. But we speak about how we need to pierce these elevations of women into pivotal roles from newness to norm. we consider it’s really critical to concentration on that,” Engelbert said. “It was a big understanding to me privately to get this role. What we didn’t comprehend was what a big understanding it was outward the organisation to get this role. It’s been good to show that women can be leaders of big companies.” 

Engelbert juggles a bustling report between her personal life and work life, but she creates it work. Outside of the office, she’s a mom to two adult children. 

“It is really critical to be a role model, and to share stories about how it works and how infrequently it doesn’t work,” she said. “And then learn from when it doesn’t work, how you can adjust.”

In Sep 2016, Engelbert changed Deloitte’s leave policy, a pierce that was well-received within the company and helped them keep staff, as good as contest in the marketplace for talent. 

“Our family leave program we consider is industry-leading. Sixteen weeks for men and women, not just for parental leave, but for any family matters. It’s been amazingly positive,” Engelbert said. “Our people are fired up. The best email we got was from a man who pronounced ‘I wish we never have to use it for a sick primogenitor or a sick child but if gives me assent of mind that it’s there’. We did something that was right for the people.”

“You’ve been looking this year to reposition Deloitte,” Lush interjected. “Deloitte already serves about 85 percent of the Fortune 500, and you’ve been looking at being an creation catalyst. With that, you’ve determined a series of vital partners: Apple, Amazon, Facebook and HP. What do those partnerships bring to Deloitte?”

“I consider it’s clear, no one company can do it alone in this fast-paced industrial revolution. We’re apparently really good at portion the clients, have really good relations with clients,” Engelbert said. “We also partner with rising expansion companies. So there’s a whole ecosystem where we consider about it.”

“The hardest partial about being a CEO today, we think, is there so many shifts going on,” she continued. “Where do you muster your capital? What choices to do you make? What impact do you wish to have? Then, you have to bring in the fact with a 62 percent millennial workforce, the people wish purpose driven in all we do. And you’ve got to take caring of well-being. So, it’s a fascinating time to be a personality and make these choices in how, again, you allot not only your human capital, your financial capital, but your own time as a CEO.” 

Asked what she wished she had famous progressing in her career, Engelbert responded: “Your career is not linear, it changes. You need to lift your palm and have certainty and take risks. When you don’t wish to do something, you have to have what you wish to do right behind it. The personality that thinks of you for positions wants to know you’re assisting solve another problem they competence have.

“I wish we had famous some-more about when to lift my hand, how much certainty we could have in myself and my abilities,” she continued. “I share my story a lot about failures we had since we learn so much some-more from the failures than the successes.” 


Is it probable to change the world? Can we still make the world a better place for us all to live? UNICEF special confidant Claudia Romo Edelman and Hub Culture executive editor Edie Lush — hosts of the Global Goalscast — trust the answer is a resounding ‘yes,’ and that everybody can play a part. Subscribe to the podcast here.

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Image copyright AFP Image caption Karimachiani, right, has been banned for 6 months Wrestling’s global …