The can’t-miss Korean quick food at this Midtown food hall

The food justice called Food Gallery 32 in Midtown was forward of its time when it non-stop 7 years ago on 32nd St., just a few blocks from the B sight hire at 34 St.-Herald Square. Modern food halls are now everywhere, but this one still entices. It’s home to a dozen vendors of Korean, Japanese and Chinese quick food (plus a dungeon phone store and a kiosk selling beer, consequence and soju). Here are 5 stalls worth a stop.

Packaged goods

At Mama, you can select from several opposite fish-shaped waffle desserts.

At Mama, you can select from several opposite fish-shaped waffle desserts.

(Gregg Vigliotti/For New York Daily News)

The menu at Mama is a rarely curated collection of snacks, many of them stuffed. On the delicious side you have “bunns,” or oversized steamed dumplings in an array of flavors and fillings, like a dark immature duck curry or a fever yellow kimchi. (One costs $4, two go for $6.50). The mark also creates the fish-shaped waffle cones called taiyaki, first done famous in Japan. Molds are filled with beat and pureed red bean, cream cheese, or Nutella, and baked to order. Large fish cones start at $3, and there are “croissant” versions with flaky pastry, and a swift of mini-fish dipped in chocolate or sprinkles and sole eight to an order.

Mama: 11 W. 32nd St., nearby Fifth Ave., (212) 643-1000

Get good food nearby New York University at these spots

Crepes with crunch

Try this fritter crepe pressed with boiled duck at Jian Bing Man. 

Try this fritter crepe pressed with boiled duck at Jian Bing Man. 

(Gregg Vigliotti/For New York Daily News)

The categorical draw at Jian Bing Man is the jian bing, which here are Northern Chinese mung bean- and wheat-flour crepes blended with eggs and scallions, then folded up over crunchy fillings like a crispy-thin covering of flaky fritter ($7.55). There are a dozen $1 toppings like cucumber or bean sprouts, and 6 delicious sauces, from a yogurt-lemon to a honeyed and sharp soybean paste. For even some-more flavor, there are extra-special filled versions, like a flaky fritter crepe pressed with boiled duck nuggets ($9.99). The rest of the menu is some-more straightforward, but it’s worth a try too, and includes Northern Chinese character dishes like prohibited pot or honeyed potato noodle soup with a green gas and the narcotic spice of Szechuan peppercorns ($6.99).

Jian Bing Man: 11 W. 32nd St., 212-695-1388

Seoul Food

Churro sundaes and other juicy candy line this Nolita sight stop

A cold buckwheat noodle plate at Seoul.

A cold buckwheat noodle plate at Seoul.

(Gregg Vigliotti/For New York Daily News)

Seoul is your go-to for fast, filling, native Korean lunches like boiled dumplings, meats over rice, and dozens of noodle dishes. There are udon soups with seafood ($8.99), Korean-style present ramen with ham and chili salsa ($9.99), black bean and pig salsa over wheat noodles ($6.99), and also $8.99 steel bowls of Korean cold buckwheat noodles called naengmyeon. They’re dressed in a semi-frozen sour-sweet broth, and surfaced with preserved cucumbers, skinny slices of radish and poached beef.

Seoul: 11 W. 32nd St., no phone

Korean BBQ

An Eel BBQ Rice Platter from Kobeque. 

An Eel BBQ Rice Platter from Kobeque. 

(Gregg Vigliotti/For New York Daily News)

Grilled meats, Korean-style are the concentration at Kobeque, where you can sequence cooking and grilled pork, beef, eel, duck or shrimp as rice bowls, salads, burgers, noodles, wraps and tacos. (Prices operation from $9 to $15). But those who wish limit season should opt for the candid “BBQ Rice Platter.” It comes with a beef of your choosing, rice, vegetables, radish kimchi and your choice of 3 house-made banchan, the Korean tiny plates of pickles and other snacky sides.

New York’s best $2 lunch and some-more tasty, inexpensive Chinatown options

Kobeque: 11 W. 32nd St., (347) 922-8819

Sugar artists

The Milky Puff from Spot Dessert Bar. 

The Milky Puff from Spot Dessert Bar. 

(Gregg Vigliotti/For New York Daily News)

The top building of Food Gallery 32 is sanctified with the bathroom, the best views in the food gymnasium (when the hulk window isn’t covered by scaffolding) and an outpost of the Korean sequence called Spot Dessert Bar. Simplicity is not their thing. These desserts are masterpieces with mixed components, from anniversary mango sodas with jellied fruit and ice cream; to choux smoke fritter surfaced with churned cream, ice cream, white chocolate “honeycomb” drizzled with sugar and a shower of honeyed corn flakes. Most are $9.95.

Spot Dessert Bar: 11 W. 32nd St., (212) 967-0269

Tags: featured lifestyle food eating along the b line Send a Letter to the Editor Join the Conversation: facebook Tweet

Check Also

French chef: Take my Michelin stars away

Michelin-starred cook Sebastien Bras has asked the universe famous dining beam to dump him. Bras, …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *